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know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
and on the united states supreme court. [applause] we have come so far carried we have come so far. why are we having to fight in 2012 against politicians who want to end access to birth control? it is likely woke up on a bad "mad men." "bad me [laughter] when mitt romney turns the clock back on process, the progress, it has real consequences. women like libby bruce, who you just heard from gary or women like a 27 year-old woman whose stage to press cancer was caught at a health center and thanked god she is now cancer free. [applause] or, the woman who went on facebook after paul ryan voted to defund planned parenthood and posted, i guess they do not understand us military wives go to planned parenthood when a doctor on base cannot see us. mr. romney and mr. ryan are campaigning for women's vote tby saying women need their help. this is coming from two men who would turn women's health-care decision over to our bosses and who will not even stand up for equal pay for women. my grandmother back in texas would have said, any more help from mitt romney, [unintelligible] here is the good news. we
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
/11 in the united states -- was that your testimony? >> is a daunting statistics. i got this information of a steve emerson's investigative product website, where he has all the court records of every single muslim are extremists arrested in the country since 9/11. that is my sources can pump. -- that is where my sources came from. >> many people in the community did not understand to sikhs -- who they were intel the tragedy occurred. how does the sikh fit into milwaukee before the tragedy, and how would you describe the outpouring corresponds that occurred? >> sikhs are a different religion, a different race -- they will come up to you and asking for you are. people do not ask towho sikhs are. if a person asks me, who am i? what is that on your head? i would love to tell them what it is. people do not do that. they should start doing that. to get the fact that it is right. it is a turban. >> ok. how have you been moving forward since the tragedy with respect to your place of worship and your ability to come and worship without fear? >> on my what? >> the level of fear that occurred when the traged
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
if the united states had agreed to the retention of the institution of the emperor. that's from a book called "the pathology of power," norman cousins. leo jilad was the first scientist to conceive how an atomic might be made in 1933. he speaks of a meeting with the head scientist of the manhattan project. here's the quote. i told oppenheimer it would be a great mistake to use the bomb generals cities of japan. well, don't you think that if we tell the russians what we intend to do and use the bomb in japan, the russians will understand it? they'll understand it only tool well, jilad replied. brigadier general clark, who was the military intelligence officer preparing for preparing intercepted japanese cables, quote, when we didn't need to do it and we knew we didn't need to do it, and they knew that we didn't need to do it, we used them as an experiment for two atomic bombs, unquote. this is quoted in "the decision to use the atomic bomb." perowicz said i think it can be proven that the bottom was not only unnecessary but knowing in advance not to be necessary. another quote, the japanese po
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
to fund programs all over the united states where we wouldn't only improve -- we wouldn't only build things that we need, but improve them. the american society of civil engineers has addressed this issue, mr. speaker. what they have said, 2.3 trillion of infrastructure maintenance needs to be done. i come from the city of minneapolis and in my city, we had a bridge fall into the mississippi river. maintenance in this country is critical. we have bridges that are old and deteriorating all over this country. we have bridges that are in need of repair, roads as well, and we also have other projects that need to be taken care of, in terms of our grid and wastewater treatment, in terms of all types of important infrastructure. but we have not invested. we are relying on things that our grandparents gave us. we are relying on eisenhower-era infrastructure, because we haven't in our age focused on the needs of the american people to have infrastructure bill. just to talk a little bit more about the american jobs act, it would also extend cutting payroll taxes in half for 98% of businesses.
to the protests in a number of countries. let me state very clearly, and i hope it is obvious that the united states government had absolutely nothing to do with this video. we absolutely reject its content and message. america's commitment to religious tolerance goes back to the very beginning of our nation. as you know, we are a place that is home to people of all religions. many come to this country seeking the right to exercise their own religion, including of course millions of muslims. we have the greatest respect for people of faith. to us and to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensible. as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. we greatly appreciate that many muslims in the united states and around the world have spoken out on this issue. violence has no place in religion and is no way to honor religion. islam respects the fundamental dignity of human beings. it is a violation of that fundamental dignity to wage attacks on innocents. as long
on, good jobs. right here in the united states of america. [applause] when it comes to the health of our families, barack refused to listen to those folks who told him to leave health reform for another day. another president. he did not care whether it was the easy thing to do politically. that is not how he was raised. he cared that it was the right thing to do. [applause] he did it because he believed that here in america, our grandparents should be able to afford their medicine. our kids should be able to see a doctor when they are sick. and no one in this country should ever go broke because of an accident or illness. [applause] and he believes that women are more than capable of making our own choices about our bodies and our health care. [applause] that is what my husband stands for. when it comes to giving our kids reeducation they deserve, barack knows that like me and so many of you, he never could have attended college without financial aid. and believe it or not, when we were first married, our combined monthly student loan bill was actually higher than our market. we
was the biggest terrorist incident before 9/11 that the united states history had. a man who had been on my secret service detail had transferred there because he thought it would be a great place to raise his children. he was killed that day. along with other people. i had, like every politician, on occasion, gotten upset. and referred to government bureaucrats. i promised myself i would never use those two words together for the rest of my life. i would treat those people who serve our country with respect whether they are in uniform, law enforcement, fire fighters, and the other thing. [applause] that is it. if you are working for the future, i think the president's plan is better. i know the economic plan is better. and i know it will not amount to a hill of beans if you do not register and vote and get your friends to. so do it. god bless you all. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> have you visited the c-span campaign 2012 website? it can watch events from the campaign trail. you can also read what the candidates are saying on major issues like the economy, the deficit, national security, and immig
of the united states melted down dramatically. trillions of dollars were lost because the markets did not work properly. secondly, i served as ohio attorney general. why do we need one? i have 1500 people in my office because somebody has to enforce the law. >> i am a colonists. vanist.thinnes i understand it is not the nature of an agency to leave things alone whether they are good or bad. that is part of my concern. that is part of the anxiety. as i have talked about -- to those people who are involved, that is the anxiety that is traded. they feel like whether they are acting in good faith or not, hanging overnd villville their head. >> when you were explaining your calvanist, i hope you are not pointing at me. >> thank you. finally. good to see you again. when you get to me, you know it is almost over. you say in your opening statement that your push for accountability extends beyond mortgage servicing or holding both banks and nonbanks accountable. we had a hearing last week on credit bureaus in particular. i am not sure if you are aware of two pieces of legislation. one would address med
. everyone will talk about how the president of the united states is sitting there for a long time. you have the stadium flap, then the jerusalem flat. the momentum they have got out of yesterday -- will have to see what happens tomorrow. >> the storage and tomorrow that i see is not what happened in the time warner irina. is this other stuff, what the president's speech will be, all of those things. the only speech we are talking about, anybody is talking about, is bill clinton's. there was a long roster of other people -- i do not think anybody else will talk about them. >> what is fascinating is that neither campaign thinks there'll be much of the bomb or movement in the polls from the two conventions. they think they will come out of it tied. it will be tied, probably, until we get to the debate. we all agree -- agree the debates will be in the corporate moment. there is still at 6%-10% who are not satisfied with what they got of the last four years but are not yet sold at mitt romney is a possibly safer bet to do a good job and the economy. >> one thing that will last -- president obama
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14